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EU’s disastrous Copyright Reform bill approved (Page 1 of 2)

20th June 2018

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Note: This post has been moved from Latest Picks due to length of extended updates.

And threatening to come after you had to/still have to accept privacy polices and give cookie permissions on seemingly ever website you have ever visited due to the European Union’s General Protection Privacy Regulation (GDPR) regulations which took effect last month (22nd May 2018):

‘Disastrous’ copyright bill vote approved (bbc.co.uk).

EU Copyright Reform
The European Parliament’s Committee on Legal Affairs voted by 15 votes to 10 to adopt Article 13 and by 13 votes to 12 to adopt Article 11.

Which will now go, in the style of European bureaucracy to a wider European Parliament vote in July.

But what does it all mean and why have I technically fell foul of Article 11 by quoting and even citing in HTML markup the Beeb article above for from source authority and again in the journalistic content I’m again about to briefly quote from and link to:

The EU’s disastrous Copyright Reform, explained by its lovers and haters (thenextweb.com).

#SaveTheLink

Michael Jackson “I just came here to read the comments” meme
Inspector Clouseau
Article 11, a.k.a. link tax, would force anyone using snippets of journalistic online content to get a license for the publisher first—essentially outlawing current business models of most aggregators and news apps.

Oh dear, and there I am a humble illustrator of pornified pop culture gossip juxtaposed with world events not particularly making any profit from website, especially the ad revenue profit that encourages scrapers and scraper bots to scape content to put ads alongside.

Article 13, a.k.a. censorship machines, will make platforms responsible for monitoring user behavior to stop copyright infringements, but basically means only huge platforms will have the resources to let users comment or share content.

So basically saying everything is likely copyrighted when uploaded and platform should be aware that it will no be responsible rather than requiring copyright holder to contact platform to ask them to take down what a user has uploaded, leading to the predication of the the death of the meme from users no longer being able to upload clips of MJ snacking on popcorn in the Thriller cinema to GoogleTube and the same clip over and over again to every social media service allowing image posting.

But if it were user-generated content and to kill memes that this really trying to combat then the fact that only the behemoths like Google and Facebook will have the resources to adhere will further make then the only social-share game in town and would suggest that the EU has put The Pink Pather’s Inspector Clouseau in charge of policing them.

But who is this really aiming to punish?

Because really this is all to punish Google who the EU has lambasted for many years for not paying enough tax and getting GoogleTube to compete with steaming services with record labels and artists demanding recompense from the platform on which many use as their sole access to music:

Music industry goes to war with YouTube (theguardian.com).

This struggle was thrown into sharp relief last week when the UK industry revealed that artists earned more from vinyl sales in 2016 than they did from YouTube payments for viewings of music videos.

But the fact that the bureaucrats have decided to seemingly lump links and snippets of text from aggregators and news apps on top of music and film clip memes that would have once been defended as fair use—and may in fact still be—on to their reform plan in Article 11 still seemingly suggests Clouseau is on the case somewhere.

And that “link tax” in Article 11 specifically mentioning a listing and snippet by search engines as not considered as fair and proportionate remuneration (juliareda.eu), which will mean press publishers could start to try and ask Google’s corporate restructuring parent company Alphabet Inc. (13th Aug. 2015) to pay for posting said snippets. And Google own Google News service could perhaps be seen as the epitome of news aggregation services mentioned.

But doubtless those desiring to tax snippets and links will not stop with those rampaging search and social behemoths and the EU’s cack-handed legislation to punish and tax Google will punish everybody else in the process.

Updated 1st July 2018

‘We’re righting a wrong,’ say the artists taking on YouTube (theguardian.com).

YouTube makes money from advertising and last year paid $856m (£650m) in royalties to music companies—an estimated 67 cents from each of its 1.3 billion music lovers annually.

Putting GoogleTube right at the bottom of the list of what streaming service pay, in fact nearly half of what the next lowest pays (hypebot.com, Jul. 2017).

Updated 3rd July 2018

Readers of Wikipedia in the UK—still currently a part of the EU and so I assume visitors in the other 27 countries of the EU—are greeted with a banner at the top, not the usual banner with Jimmy Wales’ sad eyes asking for donations but rather a keenness to show its opposition and hopes of engaging readers to react to the new copyright directive which the European Parliament will vote on on the 5th of the month, a lot sooner than some may have suspected from the European bureaucratic leviathan.

To all our readers in the UK

With the “read about it on Wikipedia” link giving more information and also highlighting the vagueness of the directive with much still open to fearful speculation: Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market (Wikipedia).

The meme is sa…

But indeed, popcorn eating MJ in the Thriller cinema is safe to be uploaded in comments section of every post for the foreseeable future—even though it was pointed out by reform campaigners that parody content is protected by existing laws—with the European Parliament voting to reject the bill:

LATEST: European Parliament votes to block copyright reform (politico.eu).

The rejected bill, which aimed to beef up enforcement of copyright rules online, will now be sent back to Parliament for further discussion, and all 751 European lawmakers will be able to submit fresh amendments to the text.

Although the block is only temporary, seemingly postponing the directive until 10th September 2018 due to the majority of votes in the EU Parliament favoring holding back on a decision and giving time for amendment horse trading to occur.

Updated 10th September 2018

EU Copyright Reform back in Parliament for vote (Latest Picks 10th September 2018).

Updated 12th September 2018

Oh dear: EU Parliament approves controversial copyright reform bill (Latest Picks 12th September 2018).

The next step is for Parliament to open negotiations with EU governments and the Commission to agree a common position.

Updated 22nd January 2019

With many foreseeing their chances of becoming a monitised influencer stolen from them without memes and doctored clips and some still making superhero sabre rattling memes vowing to fight to save a “free” internet that will be lost without freedom of speech allowed albeit upon back of someone’s copyrighted property, the battle at the moment has as its general one of GoogleTube’s biggest stars, Swedish-born but Brighton in Blighty-living Let’s Play-styled gaming influencer PewDiePie (Wikipedia):

Ukip declares it ‘stands with PewDiePie’ and urges followers to subscribe over T-Series (metro.co.uk).

PewDiePie and UKIP’s Gerard Batten
PewDiePie going live action and UKIP’s Gerard Batten spying opportunity
The official Ukip Twitter has declared it ‘stands with PewDiePie’ and has urged its followers to subscribe to the gamer to keep the ‘corporate’ T-Series from taking YouTube’s top spot.

Pewdie, having had Disney-owned Maker Studios multi-channel network cut its lucrative ties with him over embarrassing anti-Semitic jokes in 2017, being dropped from the Google Preferred advertising program and having his YouTubeRed series cancelled for the same, now mobalising his young “Bro Army” to unite under the “Bro Fist flag” being somewhat keen to keep status of most-subscribed on GoogleTube having been losing ground to Indian music label T-Series and gaining attention and support of a party equally keen to gain attention and support that has recently looked to transisition into the new BNP with mutual support of Tommy Robinson (theguardian.com, Nov. 2018), co-founder and former leader of the English Defense League (EDL), former member of the far right British National Party (BNP) now self-styled Lil’ English martyr who pinched as an alias for “protection” the name of a former football hooligan from a gang of white football hooligans who terrorised Luton Asians (Wikipedia) and to lesser extent “incredibly intimidating” and “looking for trouble” football hooligan himself (bbc.co.uk, Jul. 2011), appointed as a Kipper political adviser even if current party rules disallow him being elected because of those links as a member.

UKIP: “Are you doing your part? Help protect freedom of speech on the internet by sharing and signing this petition against the EU Copyright Directive.”

Indeed, that be Kipper-skipper Gerard Batten seeing that as influencing impressionable youth on 4chan and Reddit helped elect Orange Don as face and hair of America so to can this Pie chaps young gamers help get Kipper an MP or perhaps two to match their 2014 heyday, with the poundland party getting a good deal on some lifesize Duke Nukem cardboard cutouts to put around the office to join the protest party.

Next page

Next page: Final version of Article 13 agreed after three days of talks in Paris.

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